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The Magic Moonlight Flower And Other Enchanting Stories

by

  • Category Red Turtle
  • Format PB
  • Imprint Red Turtle
  • Price 295
  1. ISBN: 978-81-291-2996-3
  2. Pages: 108 pages
  3. Date: February 2014

ABOUT THIS BOOK

Sujan can imitate the calls of all kinds of birds and animals. When he finds himself in the
king’s court and learns of a fearsome bird-eating monster, he decides to use his skill to
defeat the cruel creature and win the princess’s heart. In another story, Ratan is cursed
by a sage and is turned into an ogre, but his sweet song saves him from a terrible fate.
In ‘Gangaram’s Lucky Stone’ a beautiful rainbow-coloured stone rescues Gangaram
from all kinds of disasters and even brings him a treasure, but what happens when he
gives it away? And, in ‘The Magic Moonlight Flower’, a young boy goes in search of the
flower that will save his father’s life, but on the way he will need to fight a cruel king,
rescue a prince and slay a nasty serpent.
Funny, exciting and full of strange and wonderful humans and supernatural creatures,
The Magic Moonlight Flower and Other Enchanting Stories is a delightful collection of
stories by a master of children’s writing in India.

AUTHOR OF THE BOOK

SATYAJIT RAY (1921–’92) was one of the greatest film-makers of his time. He was also a
writer, publisher, illustrator, calligrapher, graphic designer and film critic. He authored
several short stories and novels for young readers and created immortal fictional
characters like Feluda, the sleuth, and Professor Shonku, the scientist. He edited the
Bengali children’s magazine Sandesh, started by his grandfather, Upendrakishore Ray.
In 1992, he was awarded the Oscar for Lifetime Achievement by the Academy of
Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. In the same year he was also honoured with the
Bharat Ratna.
~
ARUNAVA SINHA translates classic, modern and contemporary Bengali fiction and
non-fiction into English. Twenty of his translations have been published so far. Twice
the winner of the Crossword translation award for Sankar’s Chowringhee (2007) and
Anita Agnihotri’s Seventeen (2011), respectively, he has also been shortlisted for The
Independent Foreign Fiction prize (2009) for his translation of Chowringhee.